Meet Petter Andersson, content writer, who claims that the filter bubble is real and dangerous.

 

Hi Petter! What do you do at Ode?

– I produce quality content, scout trends and fiddle around with WordPress.

What’s your background?

– I studied sociology and cultural studies for some years, before I decided to become an Information architect. When I graduated, I had already started my career as a copywriter and Mixed Martial Arts journalist. Along with my writing I also built websites and worked as editor in chief for MMAnytt and Söderåsens miljöförbund.

What do you think is the main challenge for marketers today? 

– To deal with the fact that people really don’t like ads or commercials. It’s regarded as visual or audio noise, and that’s why they install pop up-blockers, turn off the volume on the TV and spend a good amount of time mocking the ads on Facebook, caused by different not so sharp algorithms.

Another tough nut to crack is the problem with two major companies pretty much controlling the traffic on Internet. The filter bubble is real, and it’s dangerous. The short-term advantages with customized information are small compared to risks: the credibility of companies, newspapers, science and politics.

petter-andersson

And the most common marketing or communication mistake that companies make?

– To assume that companies should cure bored or indifferent consumers by being funny or somewhat ‘crazy’, when they really should be focusing on providing real value for their customers. The old saying: “Half the money I spend on advertising is wasted; the trouble is, I don’t know which half”, is still oh so true.

That’s why any modern company should:

  1. Produce relevant, useful and truthful information, i.e. content.
  2. Measure: collect and evaluate data, to make sure their money is not going down the drain.

What do you do at work, when you think that no one sees you?

– Squats. Sitting is the new smoking.

Where do you find inspiration?

– In good journalism, books and George St. Pierre’s meticulous work ethic.

 

Meet copywriter Linnéa Gudmundson, who says today’s marketers should use the 80/20-rule – and never forget that their clients are in fact very much like themselves.

 

Hi Linnéa! What do you do at Ode?

– I’m a copywriter and strategic consultant, and co-founded the agency last year. I help our clients in making strategic decisions about communication and PR, create strategies and plan marketing activities that align with the brand’s message and concept, so that they bring both long-term and short-term results.

– I also develop the tone-of-voice, visual guidelines, slogans, copywriting for websites, ads and other types of advertising and communication platforms.

linnea-gudmundson

What’s your background?

– I have quite a mixed background … I studied journalism for three years at the University of Gothenburg, copywriting at Berghs, screenwriting at Biskops-Arnö and visual communications at Malmö University. I also studied film and video and have produced and directed a documentary that was launched at Gothenburg Film Festival.  

– Since I moved to Malmö in southern Sweden I’ve worked as a communications officer at Nordic Aid and copywriter at South Communication and Dynamic Dog. I did my internship at KAN

What do you think is the main challenge for marketers today? 

– To realize that it’s the soft values that generate the hard ones. We easily forget that our clients are in fact very much like us. We’re all humans with our different problems, who dream of true community, to belong and feel that we have a purpose. 

– I think we need to remind ourselves about that more frequently, when analyzing target groups and shaping strategies, so that the marketing really lasts, reaches the right people and feels genuine. Otherwise, no one remembers it.

And the most common marketing or communication mistake that companies make?

– So far, I’ve never met a company that works according to the 80/20-rule: Let 80 % of your communication be about the things that interest your customers. Then they will automatically listen when you talk about yourself, your services and products the remaining 20 %.

– Actually, most companies do the opposite. Even the ones with a solid plan and strategy that produce great, valuable content that their customers want to share – their marketing is still 80% focused on themselves, which gives the customers or prospects no reason to engage, interact or share anything whatsoever.

What do you do at work, when you think that no one sees you?

– I take off my shoes and listen to Dire Straits! But please don’t tell anyone. 

Where do you find inspiration?

– I’m inspired by brave people who think for themselves and have a sense of humor. I read new bloggers and thought leaders almost every day, but the most recent thing I shared on LinkedIn was a post by Fast Company, who always gives relevant insights from other marketers in an easy way, while looking ahead.

– In general I’m inspired by companies that invest in building their brand through CSR. One example is IKEA, who just built a replica of a Syrian home, bombed and with torn mattresses on the floor, as part of their campaign ”Where life happens” by Åkestam Holst. A win both for the brand and for society, and a campaign in line with their concept. It’s also viral and shareable in all different kinds of channels and social media, and possible to re-use in future campaigns.